Everything You Need to Know About Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt


The Supreme Court today ruled that abortion is completely a private matter to be decided by mother and doctor in the first three months of pregnancy. In 1973, the Supreme Court affirmed in Roe
v. Wade a woman’s constitutional right to make her own medical decisions, including
her right to choose an abortion. But in the 40 years since, conservatives have
been slowly chipping away at those rights. In 2013, Texas passed one of the country’s
most restrictive abortion laws in HB-2. A so-called TRAP law, HB-2 is aimed at limiting
womens’ access to a safe and legal abortion by targeting clinics and abortion providers. It created a set of unnecessary and unrealistic
rules that abortion clinics must meet or face closure. And the law banned abortions outright after
20 weeks, with virtually no exceptions. Texas officials sold the law as a way to protect
women’s health, but it has done the opposite. Since the law passed, many of the state’s
abortion clinics have been forced to shut down. In some parts of the state, women would need
to drive hundreds of miles to access abortion care. For low-income women in particular, the costs
of such a trip can become untenable. In 2014, abortion provider Whole Woman’s
Health sued the state on the grounds that the law is unconstitutional. They argue it
creates an undue burden on women seeking an abortion. If the Supreme Court decides to uphold this
law, it could allow other states with conservative legislatures to pass similar or even more
extreme measures. In large swaths of the country, women could
completely lose their access to abortion care. In the nation’s most conservative states,
Roe v. Wade could become meaningless. These restrictions are an assault on women’s
health and their ability to determine their futures.

3 Replies to “Everything You Need to Know About Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt”

  1. If limiting abortion is an assault on a woman's future then men already have no choice in their future.

  2. If this law is upheld, then I assert that any and every CLINIC which provides any outpatient medical procedure also have to comply with the stipulations of this bill. After all.. if it is about protecting people's healthcare, it should be about protecting ALL people's healthcare. Let All the clinics in the state share the same burden. Not just abortion/women's health clinics.

    this law stipulated the width of a hall and the size of a janitor closet to name only two of the "its for the protection of women's health" regulations. let's get real. Be honest about it… lies are cheap and transparent.

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