FFA Poultry Judging: Class 8 – Exterior Egg Quality


>>This is FFA Poultry Judging:
Class 8 – Exterior Egg Quality The specifications for the exterior
quality of shell eggs include: This is an example of a AA/A
Quality egg with no defects. The shell of an egg may be
unbroken or it may be cracked. Terms that define egg
shell soundness include: no defect, that would be
an egg shell that is unbroken. It can be AA or A Quality
and it may even be B Quality. A check, that’s an egg shell that has a
fine hair-like crack. The shell membranes
are intact and the egg
contents do not leak. That egg would
be non-gradable. A dented check,
that’s an egg shell that has a dented crack. The shell membranes
are intact and the egg
contents do not leak. That would be non-gradable. And a leaker,
an egg shell that is cracked with
a broken membranes, allowing the egg contents
to leak or be free to leak. That is considered
a non-gradable egg. Grade A and B eggs
cannot have any adhering dirt or
foreign material. Eggs with adhering material
larger than a speck should be classified as dirty. Small specks of dust or lint
that may have settled out of the air should
not be considered when making the evaluation. This is an example of an egg
with adhering material much larger than a speck
and is considered a dirty egg. Here is another
example of a dirty egg containing adhering material. This is an example
of an egg that was shown in
a state contest. The first example in the
book shows a localized, moderate stain that
covers approximately 1/32 of the shell surface. That’s a Grade B. If this had been a
localized stain greater than 1/32
of the shell, it would also be
a prominent stain and therefore
non-gradable. The second example is a
scattered moderate stain covering approximately
1/16 of the shells surface. That is also considered
a Grade B egg. The next example is
a prominent stain. An egg shell that
has localized stains covering more than
1/32 of the shell or scattered stains covering
more than 1/16 of the shell are considered
prominent stains. Prominent stains
significantly detract from the appearance of the egg
and are non-gradable.>>This egg is
decidedly misshapen and this results in
a Grade B egg.>>Body checks can cause
weakened egg shells. This is a condition
in which the egg shell looks like it’s cracked,
but the egg shell is intact. A body check occurs
during shell formation when the shell is cracked
and then partially calcified before being laid. An egg with a body check
is classified as Grade B. The body check is an
example of a texture defect. This decreases the
strength of the shell. Eggs with faulty texture
are much weaker in shell strength
and may be broken during distribution. Shells with large
calcium deposits, that would be deposits larger
than 1/8-inch in diameter, should be classified
as Grade B. Eggs with small
calcium deposits are classified
as Grade A. Here are two
additional examples of calcium deposits
that are rather large. Calcium deposits
also detract from the appearance
of the egg. A good rule of thumb
is that if you were to pull your fingernail
across a calcium deposit and a good sized hole would
be created if it came off then the egg would be
classified as a Grade B. Ridges can result
in weakened shells. Many egg shells
show small ridges and most of these should
be classified as Grade A. Those eggs with
large ridges are classed Grade B. This egg has a
pronounced thin spot which makes the egg
misshapen as well.>>Pronounced thin spots
diminish shell soundness and strength and detract from
the appearance of the egg.>>This would be a Grade B egg. © 2012 University of Georgia
College of Agricultural and
Environmental Sciences

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